Fantastic Read, out now on Amazon

The Other Side ‘The Other Side’ is the true story of a young boy who sees ghosts. With foreword by Ricky Tomlinson, this autobiographical work examines the life of a child who interacts with the dead on a daily basis, and how the ability to see them affects his family and ultimately his adult life. […]

via Autobiography Out Now on Amazon — SpiritLightbyDavidDrew

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The Daily Struggle

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John is twenty now. The year before last his struggle with OCD caused him to miss time at college and subsequently drop out. Last year he re-sat and passed the first year of his two year course with distinction. He conquered his nemesis. This year so far so good. He is top of his class despite his handicap. The trick is not to give up. He has always wanted to be an architect. When I see how hard life is for him I really hope he can achieve his goals. He has confided in me that despite the many girlfriends, he doesn’t think he will be able to have a long term relationship, marriage, children. He sees a lonely future ahead.

The psychiatrist once told him that a little bit of the OCD can be utilised to his advantage. “If my parachute needed packing, you’d be the one to do it!” he said. Perhaps the perfectionist in him could be an asset to an architect. Some small consolation perhaps for a 24 hour disability.

Jon Richardson: A Little Bit OCD documentary wins Mind Media award

Jon Richardson: A Little Bit OCD, produced by Open Mike for Channel 4 in 2013, was  shortlisted and subsequently won a Mind Media Award which the charity Mind hosts every year.

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In it’s category were four other outstanding documentaries . Open Mike were very proud to win and are quoted as saying that it was the sharing  very brave stories of those living with OCD that made it such a great documentary.

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Congratulations to all involved.

A Little bit OCD – a poem

"A little bit OCD"

When I knew my boy was haunted by
this demon in his ear
Not knowing how to help him,
My knowledge turned to fear.

I'll keep this to myself I thought,
He didn't want to be
the boy that was a weirdo,
Just 'That kid with OCD .'

But people came to notice
little signs that served to tell.
They all became an expert
"I've got OCD as well!"

"I always put my books in line
so neatly on the shelf.
My husband says that I'm 
a little bit OCD myself!"

"Take away his Xbox
if he keeps on being late.
Ground him for a week and he'll soon
Realise his mistake."

"Tell him to snap out of it.
You have to make him see.
Nip it in the bud,
we're all a wee bit OCD."

My boy can not eat or sleep
or concentrate at school.
A little bit OCD maybe
But at least he's not a fool!

Jane Drew

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My perfect son.

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In John’s early teens when he and I  suspected OCD and the rest of the world were either oblivious or in denial, John tried to combat the condition himself (without the stigma of having a label slapped on him by the medical profession)

For my part I hoped that if we ignored it, it would go away. Perhaps he would grow out of it? I wondered if acknowledging it’s existence might somehow justify the rituals and discourage John from trying to suppress them. I wonder still if time alone with OCD allows the sufferer to indulge what should be resisted. We were both naive, however, and underestimated the OCD grip!

The rituals and compulsions multiplied and became more severe with time. The realisation that this was not going to go away hung like a black cloud.

Now, years on in the midst of the battle I am still regularly fooled into thinking that all is well. Each time John has a few ‘good’ days (not to say that he is ever OCD free, but sometimes in good spirits, functioning well, sleeping, eating with only moderate compulsions), I am euphoric and find myself acting as if he is well. Perhaps he is cured? Perhaps it was all a dream and he never had it at all?!      I fall for it every time!

When the meltdown comes it devastates me anew.

I relive the heartbreaking realisation that my son is not perfect. That life will probably always be hard for him, but you know what?….

…….I am proud of him, at 16 he is already his own man despite his difficulties, he is perfect !

Understanding OCD

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The horror of discovering that my boy had OCD made me frantic to understand it. Know thine enemy.

As time has passed I have had to come to terms with the knowledge that I never really will. It is a changing beast that is not only individual to the person, but it morphs and evolves.

We have to try to understand up to a point. Then we reach the edge of the cliff looking out into a darkness through which we cannot pass, and we know our child is out there alone.

http://www.ocduk.org/understanding-ocd-video